Black History: Septima Clark

Day 12 of 28 of my Black History Month history lessons. For today’s Black History I was inspired by the podcast Stuff Mom Never Told You (@stuffmomnevertoldyou). Thanks @emiliearies and @bridgetmarieindc for highlighting Septima Clark! Some parts of her life were unfortunate but I enjoyed researching her. I started drawing her on my iPad on…

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Black History: Marley Dias

Day 11 of 28 of my Black History Month history lessons. For today’s Black History I’m so proud of this trailblazing feminist. She’s my youngest highlight so far. Marley Dias was in 6th grade when she launched a campaign #1000BlackGirlBooks in 2015. Her mom challenged her to do something when she complained about the lack of black…

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Black History: Sir Lady Java

Day 10 of 28 of my Black History Month history lessons. For today’s Black History I’m highlighting Sir Lady Java. Born in the early 1940s in New Orleans, Java transitioned at a young age with the support of her mother. She started singing and dancing in local nightclubs. She moved to Los Angeles in her early 20s and performed…

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Black History: Jane Matilda Bolin

Day 7 of 28 of Black History Month. I really love the Black History stories of trailblazers. Today is one of them. I enjoyed drawing her. While attending Wellesley College, Jane Matilda Bolin faced overt racism and social isolation yet she graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1928 and was officially recognized as…

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Black History: Paul R Williams

For Day 6 of 28 of my Black History Month series, I’m highlighting a notable architect. I’m trying to share random and maybe not-as-well-known Black History facts. (Hope you all are enjoying them.) Today it’s about Paul R Williams. Paul lost both his parents by the time he was 4 years old. He and his brother…

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Black History: Colin Kaepernick

Day 4 of 28 for my art and Black History Month facts. I debated about posting this but I thought it was appropriate and timely for the Superbowl. For day 4, I decided to draw Colin Kaepernick. Many people decided not to tune into the NFL because of the divisive stance of kneeling during the…

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Black History: Venus Williams

Today I didn’t get to do a great drawing on my commute to my Bootcamp session on the bus but this is what it ended up looking like. I’ll have to draw #VenusWilliams again. The American professional tennis player who is currently ranked world No. 8 in the Women’s Tennis Association singles rankings is none other than…

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Black History: Jesse Owens

The athlete who defied Hitler’s theory of black inferiority was none other than Jesse Owens. He won 4 gold medals at the Berlin Olympics in 1936. In each of his track events, he either tied a record or set a new one. The year prior, “His achievement of setting three world records and tying another…

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Black History: Nichelle Nichols

Every year for Black History Month (also my birthday month), I’m going to attempt to learn something daily to celebrate the rich history that people of African descent have shared with the world. I’ll be posting a daily Black History fact for your consumption, you don’t need to participate but it’s happening. Last year, many of…

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A Poem to Live by

Recently my boyfriend shared this poem with me by Chief Tecumseh (upon further research it was also ascribed to some of the Wabasha chiefs, Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, and Wovoka). However, he’s circa 1768. Tecumseh was among the most celebrated Indian leaders in history and was known as a strong and eloquent orator who promoted tribal…

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For the love of cheese

There’s a list of my favorites that I might not be able to have anymore. It’s unfortunate. The most shocking of all is cheese. I mean, who doesn’t like cheese? I’ll write an ode to cheese. It’ll go like this: Cheese. I loved you. I’ll miss you. Goodbye. Maybe a haiku will work better: Cheese,…

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